Athens is back on stage and has a fascinating story to tell

Odeum of Herodes Atticus
Odeum of Herodes Atticus

Athens is back on stage – in the frontlines of the  international newspapers -and I was back to Athens for some days to watch with my own eyes the whole performance . There was a new government and for first time in the Greek history a left party in power! And from that point, Athens’s fascinating story began.

The main characters are real bold and attractive and they are with the side of common people.They are young -Alexis Tsipras, the Prime minister is only 40 years old – handsome and eloquent – the Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis, a man with real  bravura, speaks eloquently English and Greek and he is  expertised in Game Theory of Economics.

imgres-1Alexis and Yanis went out and about in Europe as formidable actors starting their campaign by telling their story, the Greek story in a different and attractive way – not any more the old humiliated story of the capitalistic Europe about the corrupt little Greek cheaters. They were using heartfelt titles for their movement “government of national  rescue” symbols and fashion, no ties, scarfs with a mischievous brand history in order to convey easily their message to everyone in the planet.  All the international community of economists, economic analysts, journalist common people, even my uncle Raymond in his isolated farm somewhere in Wales, were fascinated by them and they want to listen and support them.

What they were saying was to remove Greece from “Palliative Care” and stop paying the big fat “doctors” and “Institutions” for this care. Let Greece and Greek people get real medicines and be responsible by themselves for their recovery. Meanwhile,  the co-stars came up on the stage and the whole performance became a bit sloppy, not any more storytelling but some murmurs about numbers and graphs…

And as Simon Kuper wrote :

If you want to be heard, you need a story. If you don’t want to be heard, don’t tell a story. Be boring. Banks and Brussels both do that brilliantly. Put out long legal documents about “collateralised debt obligations” and people will switch off. Brussels jargon about “additionality” and “subsidiarity” achieves the same effect. Once nobody is listening, the actors can do what they like.”  

IMG_1571
Journalists from Netherlands interview Greek people in Monastiraki, Athens

 

 

2 thoughts on “Athens is back on stage and has a fascinating story to tell

  1. Penelope,
    Here in the U.S. it is difficult to get unfiltered accounts of the current situation on Greece and their attempts to get out from under the “Bankers” of the EU. This is why you post energizes me. You are quite correct that the fog of financial mumbo-jumbo puts people asleep, but also lends an air of authority to what is essentially thievery. While I’m not of Greek heritage, nor have I ever been there, the story of this Greek election is one that gives me hope so rare in a world of corporate domination and rampant oligarchy.

Comments are closed.